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Savory

Thai Chicken Ramen (can be vegan)

Thai Chicken Ramen

If you want a healthy, quick and simple dinner, this is for you. This Thai Chicken Ramen is very straightforward and combines Asian flavors in a subtle, yet refreshing way. I just couldn’t get enough of it. The best thing is, if you omit the chicken, this is vegetarian and vegan at the same time. At least here in Germany it was easy to find all ingredients, we didn’t even have to go to an Asian store, but purchased all ingredients at a regular grocery store. That’s what I like, no weird ingredient needed, all very easily found.

This may sound weird, but often if a meal pleases me, you can tell by the pictures I took. In this instance my husband and me sat down, we ate the ramen in silence (which is a good sign since the food is so good that we don’t want to talk, but just enjoy it) and then I looked at my husband and said: “This is so good, I think it is worth to put on the blog. Don’t you think?” And he just nooded and took another spoonful.

Thai Chicken Ramen Continue Reading…

Arabic/Indian Minced Meat with Peas and Egg

Indian minced meat with peas

It has been a while since I last posted a savory recipe. That’s a shame. Especially considering that this is a recipe I really enjoy. Usually my husband cooks it, because, well, I am the baker of the family and he is the cook (yes, we have the best division of labor ever!). But this time around I wanted to prepare it. It is surprisingly simple and comes together in about half an hour. I especially like the spices used for the minced meat. Cilantro, turmeric, and cloves gives it its Indian flavor, but the recipe book I got this from says that it is influenced by Arabs living in India. Apparently minced meat is now also popular in India. I bow my head as boring minced meat tastes great here with peas and egg.

Indian minced meat with peas

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Torta de Fiambre – Uruguay’s take on deep-dish pizza

torta de fiambre

Pizza! Deep-dish pizza from Uruguay! I bet you have never tried this or even heard of it before. Let me introduce you to the gourmet-style version of the torta de fiambre (ham and cheese pie), which is famous in Uruguay and usually consists of ham and cheese layered between an empanada-style of dough. Think of lots of melted cheese, usually at least two different types, good-quality ham and some flaky empanada dough.  That’s the basic recipe. But I am going to add some more ingredients and make it gourmet-style, I will go crazy and add eggs, tomatos, and a seasoning called chimichurri. Did I get you? I hope I did because I am taking part in the “You had me at pizza!” blog event (only in German) organized by Marc with the wonderful bilingual blog Bake to the Roots (English and German).

you had me at pizza flyer

I am really excited I get to introduce you to a Uruguayan dish, I bet none of my readers have tried anything from the country I was born in. Uruguayan cuisine is very much influenced by the Spanish and Italian cuisine. On top of that I hope you know that beef, beef, and beef again is what Uruguay exports the most. Did you know that Uruguay has four times more cows in the country than actually people? If you are a vegetarian or even vegan, you will have a hard time in Uruguay. Meat can be found in abundance.

torta de fiambre

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Chicago Style Pizza (can be vegetarian)

Chicago style pizza

Everybody has an opinion how the perfect pizza is supposed to taste like. There are huge fights about the pizza dough, the thickness, the crust, the amount of cheese, the toppings. I know. I am not getting into that. I am simply going to introduce you to a pizza which is more like a pie. And since I like pie, I was excited to try this one. Deep-dish pizza is another term for this pizza. Because you need a springform. You will put so much cheese and tomato sauce onto it that the regular circle simply doesn’t cut it. Chicago style pizza is my new favorite. It starts with a very buttery dough, which is then sprinkled with mozzarella cheese (yes, the cheese goes on the bottom), then comes some chorizo (if you like it to be non-vegetarian) and then lots and lots of tomato sauce. Let’s have a closer look at each layer: Continue Reading…

One-pot Vegetable Lasagna

Ina from the blog Ina is(s)t (German) invites people to participate to create a recipe with pasta. I usually prefer baking to cooking, but whenever asked to create a recipe, I get excited. Since my husband broke his ankle a while ago, I have to be the housewive anyway and so I thought I might as well see what I can do with pasta. I mean, everybody loves pasta, right, so why not try? While checking what options are out there, I stumbled across the one-pot lasagna. Have you every heard of it? I hadn’t. The basic idea is to create lasagna in one pot. So no horrible preparation of different sauces and then layering everything into a dish and then finally putting the lasagna in the oven while you are already snacking because you got so hungry during the process. No, here you simply make the whole lasagna in a pot.  You do need a deep skillet for this with at least 30cm in diameter and you need a lid. But other than that, this is really simple.

So as I said, the basic idea is that you cook the lasagna noodles in tomato sauce. You need to be sure to have enough liquid to get them nicely cooked, but since you are doing everything in the skillet, the lasagna is ready much quicker than if done the traditional way. Once you chopped the vegetables, this lasagna is ready in half an hour. I don’t think you can beat that.

Moreover, you can go wild with the vegetables, add some sausages or whatever you see fit. As long as you manage to have enough tomato sauce to cover the lasagna noodles, you can be creative. The recipe below is a vegetarian version with a lot of basil, mozzarella, and parmesan.

One Pot Vegetable Lasagna

Print Recipe
Serves: 3-4 people Cooking Time: 15min preparation + ca. 30min cooking time

Ingredients

  • Olive oil for the skillet
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 1 large glove of garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon of sweet paprika powder
  • 1 teaspoon of hot paprika powder
  • 1 teaspoon of Cayenne pepper
  • 1 red bell pepper, diced, another option is diced carrots
  • Mushrooms to your liking (I cut about 8-9) or other vegetables
  • 1 can of 425ml of diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 1 can of 425ml of pizza sauce with tomato with basil/oregano
  • 250 milliliters of prepared vegetable broth
  • 1 teaspoon of salt
  • 2 teaspoons of dried herbs from the Provence
  • 1 teaspoon of dried rosemary
  • 2 teaspoons of dried basil
  • 6-8 uncooked lasagna noodles
  • 100 grams of ground mozzarella
  • For garnish: fresh basil, salt, pepper, parmesan and a dash of ricotta, sour cream, natural yoghurt, etc.

Instructions

1

First drizzle olive oil in a deep skillet of 30cm ∅. Be sure to have a lid for the skillet.

2

Add diced garlic, onion, paprika powders and Cayenne pepper and fry for a minute, stirring constantly.

3

Then add zucchini, fry for two minutes, then add all other vegetables.

4

Fry until tender, then add tomato sauce, pizza sauce, vegetable broth and additional herbs.

5

Cut uncooked lasagna noodles into three equal parts and put in tomato sauce. Be sure that noodles are fully covered in tomato sauce and can cook. Don't be afraid to press them down with a wooden spoon.

6

Put lid on top and simmer on medium-low heat for about 20min. Stir once in a while, making sure noodles have enough liquid. If they don't, add more vegetable broth.

7

Once noodles are al dente, add salt and pepper to your liking. Put mozzarella and fresh basil on top. Again put the lid on top and let simmer for another five minutes.

8

Take lasagna off the stove, take off lid and let sit for about five minutes.

9

Serve with freshly grated parmesan and a dash of ricotta, yoghurt or the like. Cut hard-boild egg in half and serve on the side of lasagna.

Notes

This is the perfect recipe for leftover vegetables. As long as your noodles are covered in tomato sauce, you are good to go. Go wild with the herbs. My version is mainly Italian, Mediterranian.